Posts Tagged ‘movies’

If Catching Fire is going to be as good(hopefully better) then the first Hunger Games film, Lionsgate will have to find a director who can pull out all the stops. Nobody can replace Gary Ross in our hearts, but we have to take a positive look towards the future. The mourning period for Gary is over and we the film is less six hundred days away as of this post. So they need to get things together if they want to start filming in August. An anonymous source with access to the list(who isn’t allowed to speak on record) gave us a glimpse of some of the names Lionsgate might be considering.

Cronenberg:

Cronenberg has frequently been offered big commercial gigs over the years, including “Return of the Jedi,” “Top Gun,” and “RoboCop,” only to turn them down for arty, independently produced work, often in the horror genre. Though Cronenberg’s best-known film is still 1986′s “The Fly,” the Canadian director has been making movies for decades, with his most recent work, the adaptation of Don DeLillo’s “Cosmopolis” starring Robert Pattinson, likely to debut in Cannes next month.

Inarritu:

For Inarritu, joining “Catching Fire” would mark a reunion with his producer from the Academy Award-nominated film “Babel” Jon Kilik, who is producing the “Hunger Game” series along with Nina Jacobson. While “Catching Fire” deals with the heavy themes of rebellion and children-on-children violence, it is still significantly lighter than Inarritu’s most recent work, “Biutiful,” the Javier Bardem-starrer that  chronicled a dying man’s attempts to make amends.

Cuaron:

Cuaron entered the blockbuster genre with “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” in 2004, but  despite great reviews didn’t stick with the boy wizard beyond the one film. Rather, he took on ambitious fare within the studio system, including Universal Pictures’ “Children of Men.” The Mexican director recently finished production on “Gravity” for Warner Bros. The film, starring George Clooney and Sandra Bullock, is about a lone survivor of a space mission trying desperately to return to Earth to reunite with his family.

Sources: LA Times and katnissthereisnodistrict12 @ Tumblr

Like the people on the list? Or would you pick someone else?

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This is not some kind of sick belated April Fools Day joke.

Gary Ross gave official notice to Summit and Lionsgate earlier this week that he will not be returning to direct Hunger Games sequel Catching Fire. While many say the motivation behind this move is based on money some think it’s much more then that. Gary may not have wanted to spend another three to four films following Katniss’s story.

Personally, I feel like it is about money, which kind of annoys me. Apparently the project he’s working on will earn him a better payday then Catching Fire. And the offer from Lionsgate to direct the film was lower then he had expected. So we’re sure it’s not about money(sarcasm intended).

We hope to hear from Lionsgate on the matter soon.

(source: IndieWire Playlist)

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(A still from one off the scenes cut from the training center sequence, with Amandla and Ethan)

Were you one of the fans clamoring for the deleted scenes on the DVD? Did you really want to see the avox storyline unfold? Hoping to get a glimpse of the other tributes interviews? Well Hunger Games Director, Gary Ross, more then hints at the fact that the DVD may not be as extra packed as we had hoped.

When Hunger Games fan Jenny submitted this question in a fan Q&A for the New York Times his feelings about “deleted scenes” were made more clear:

If you had another half hour of film run time to use — assuming no consequences or complaints for the purposes of this question — is there anything you’d add to this first film? A cutting room floor wish?

To this question he answered:

Honestly no. The movie I put out is the movie that I want, and I wouldn’t add anything to the running time. Equally, I would never make a movie too short just for sake of running time. I think a director should stand behind the cut of their film. I won’t be putting “additional” scenes on the DVD for the same reason. That said, there are a few things that I didn’t have room for in the script just for reasons of a linear narrative. A good example of that is the Avox subplot in the novel. I loved what Suzanne did but couldn’t find a way to get it in the screenplay and it was never shot.

As much as our staff trusts in Gary’s judgement we really hope he comes around and gives us a chance to see some of the pieces left on the cutting room floor. We understand him wanting the films theatrical version to be clear and concise, but would a few DVD extras really hurt anybody?

You can find the rest of his answers to the fans here at Arts Beat from the New York Times.

MTV News tries to get the scoop on how Catching Fire will pan out.

Most fans are still recovering from the insanity of the first film adaptation in the Hunger Games Trilogy. But now that fans have had a chance to view the film(in my case multiple times) they’re ready for the second film, Catching Fire, to be released.

Gary Ross has let hardly anything slip about his plans for the film, but here’s what he has said:
Ross has some idea of what the next Games will look like. “The arena in the second book is tropical and the arena in [the first] book is forests, so that in and of itself will make for a different wardrobe on the part of the crew,” he explained.
“In terms of the cinematic differences in the way I might shoot the movie, I shot this in a very specific way that’s very different than most franchises are shot, obviously, and that had a lot to do with the urgency of what’s going on and Katniss’ point of view,” he continued. “I have some ideas about how to do ‘Catching Fire’ slightly differently, but I don’t want to share them yet. Not because I’m being evasive, but just because they’re not fully baked. But yes, I think it will look and feel slightly different from the first.”(source: MTV News)

So we want to know how you think Gary Ross will make the arena look. Should he stick with the same shooting style, or does this film call for another approach? Let us know in the comments!